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Calling For Help

Calling the emergency services is straightforward. Here is some additional information that many people have not considered

Last Updated 08 July 2024

In an emergency always call 999

An emergency is described as when: 

  • A crime is in progress
  • Someone who is suspected of a crime is nearby
  • There is danger to life
  • Violence is being used, is imminent, or an attack has taken place.

In these cases, it is essential that:

  1. Police are alerted immediately
  2. You follow their advice/instruction
  3. You maintain the integrity of the scene (do not touch or clean up anything)

In other incidents, where a non-emergency response is required - call 101.

When calling 999

  1. Contact the emergency services as soon as possible. Do not assume a call has already been made.
  2. State you are a high-risk individual and why. Give your location.  You should state in short, simple language what has happened.
  3. Do not put yourself at risk. Identify a safe place to make the call away from danger or use the emergency SOS system described below if it is on the discreet setting.
  4. Phones should be on silent if attackers are nearby. On a mobile, dialling 999 can be followed by 55 for a transfer to the police. Also, you can pre-programme your phone as below.
  5. Police can also be messaged in an emergency using the SMS service (if the phone has been preregistered for this service).

Setting up emergency SOS on your mobile phone

You can set up your mobile telephone so that when activated it will call the emergency services, share location information and message emergency contacts. Once set up, triggering a response will normally involve something like pressing the power button five times. It can be programmed to be noisy or discreet.  It can be cancelled if activated in error.

Setting up emergency SOS features will vary depending on the type of mobile phone you have and the operating system it runs on. However, it is easy to do and information is available online to guide you through the process. Emergency SOS is also available on most smart watches with a mobile connection or wifi, and via the Ecall feature available in new vehicles sold since 2018.

View Video Transcript

[person open zip bag]

Yep, ok.

Morning.

Hello Michael.

[VO]: Everyone is subject to some risks to their personal safety and security.

[woman reporting into a camera]

[VO]: Your work and personal profile could make you a high-risk individual.

Take a seat. How can I help you?
[man bangs table with his hands]

I’ve got a problem, I’ve been evicted. I’ve been trying to tell you lot for weeks.

[VO]: Being aware of what happening around you,

[You stole those items]

[VO]: planning ahead and knowing what to do in an incident will help keep you and your loved ones safe.

[VO]: We carry around devices every day that can help in in an emergency.

And I did that
[man bangs the table again with his hands]

[VO]: Most smart phones, smart watches with a mobile connection or wi-fi and vehicles can quickly notify the emergency services and share your location.

[VO]: Familiarising yourself with these features could save valuable time in the event of an emergency.

Check how your device is activated.

[man bangs the table again with his hands]
I’ve had enough.

[VO]: Most models are activated by five rapid presses

[begins to shout]
I’m not angry.

[VO]: Activation will start a countdown so you can cancel the call if needed.

[man bangs the table, uses expletives].

[VO]: You can send an alert silently or with an alarm

[alarm beeping sound]
[VO]: Which can itself act as a deterrent.

[VO]: Some in- car eCall systems first call the manufacturer’s response team before putting you in touch with the emergency services.

Emergency services, how can I help?

[VO]: I addition to the emergency services

Okay, I can see your position

[VO]: you can specify emergency contacts to receive a message, letting them know that you need help.

[VO]: This can also warn them of any possible security risk.

I can see your position.

Try and make your way to somewhere busy.

The police are on their way.

Are they still following you?

Yes they are.

Keep driving. Don’t go home. The police are on their way.

[VO]: in an emergency every second count.

[man is shouting]
You don’t understand.

Is everything ok?

Excuse me! 
I think there is a man following me. Is it okay if I wait here?

Just wait there until the police arrive.

[VO]: planning ahead and learning how your device and vehicle activate an emergency call could save valuable time.

[phone vibrates on desk]
Hello? Yes it’s okay, they’ve just left.

[police sirens]

[VO]: Helping to keep you and your loved ones safe.

The police are here now.

Good stay on the line and I’ll give you the all clear.

[person open zip bag] 

 

Yep, ok.

 

Morning. Hello Michael.

 

[VO]: Everyone is subject to some risks to their personal safety and security.

 

[woman reporting into a camera]

 

[VO]: Your work and personal profile could make you a high-risk individual. 

 

Take a seat. How can I help you?

 

[man bangs table with his hands]

 

I’ve got a problem, I’ve been evicted. I’ve been trying to tell you lot for weeks. 

 

[VO]: Being aware of what happening around you, 

 

[You stole those items]

 

[VO]: planning ahead and knowing what to do in an incident will help keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

[VO]: We carry around devices every day that can help in in an emergency. 

 

And I did that 

 

[man bangs the table again with his hands] 

 

[VO]: Most smart phones, smart watches with a mobile connection or wi-fi and vehicles can quickly notify the emergency services and share your location. 

 

[VO]: Familiarising yourself with these features could save valuable time in the event of an emergency.

 

Check how your device is activated.

 

[man bangs the table again with his hands] 

 

I’ve had enough.

 

[VO]: Most models are activated by five rapid presses

 

[begins to shout]

 

I’m not angry.

 

[VO]: Activation will start a countdown so you can cancel the call if needed. 

 

[man bangs the table, uses expletives].

 

[VO]: You can send an alert silently or with an alarm

 

[alarm beeping sound]

 

[VO]: Which can itself act as a deterrent.

 

[VO]: Some in- car eCall systems first call the manufacturer’s response team before putting you in touch with the emergency services. 

 

Emergency services, how can I help?

 

[VO]: I addition to the emergency services

 

Okay, I can see your position

 

[VO]: you can specify emergency contacts to receive a message, letting them know that you need help.

 

[VO]: This can also warn them of any possible security risk.

 

I can see your position.

 

Try and make your way to somewhere busy. 

 

The police are on their way. 

 

Are they still following you?

 

Yes they are.

 

Keep driving. Don’t go home. The police are on their way. 

 

[VO]: in an emergency every second count.

 

[man is shouting]

 

You don’t understand.

 

Is everything ok?

 

Excuse me! 

I think there is a man following me. Is it okay if I wait here?

 

Just wait there until the police arrive.

 

[VO]: planning ahead and learning how your device and vehicle activate an emergency call could save valuable time. 

 

[phone vibrates on desk]

 

Hello? Yes it’s okay, they’ve just left.

 

[police sirens]

 

[VO]: Helping to keep you and your loved ones safe.

 

The police are here now.

 

Good stay on the line and I’ll give you the all clear.

subtitled version

See the following links:

Android: Get help during an emergency with your Android phone - Android Help (google.com) 

IOS: Use Emergency SOS on your iPhone – Apple Support (UK)

For Vehicles (eCall): eCall SOS - National Highways 

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